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Training Review – Ed’s Manifesto – Mixed Skills Module in Washington, DC

The Sneak Reaper – Ed’s Manifesto

Over the weekend of 9-12 February, 2018, I travelled to Washington, DC & Alexandria, VA to train at District Combatives’ hosting of Ed Calderon (of Ed’s Manifesto), who was conducting a Mixed Skills module of training.

The trip down to DC from Toronto was relatively uneventful.  I got in early on Friday and spent the day sightseeing and getting the lay of the land in and around the area where we would be training.  I wasn’t sure as to what the training would entail, so with a map from the hotel front desk and my trusty feet, I learned the area around the training location and did some touristy things.

White House. One of the Secret Service guys gave me a great recommendation for breakfast 2 blocks away. He wasn’t wrong. Thanks Jerry!
The Spy Museum. You can’t not visit if you’re in DC.
J. Edgar Hoover Building. Home of the FBI and X-Files.
WW2 Memorial.
Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial.
The Mall.

I ended Friday night at a small pizza place which made amazing slices and helped myself to three and a “Mexican Coke” (produced in Mexico, in glass bottles, using sugar, not corn syrup) to top it off.

REALLY good pizza.

Day 1

Saturday morning was smooth.  I found my way easily to the training venue in the drizzle.  When I arrived, I was warmly greeted by Ben from District Combatives and handed a pile of liability waivers.  I was delighted to see a couple of familiar faces from previous training I had attended in the US and immediately took to catching up.  I even met a few others whom I’d only known as Instagram followers but quickly bridged to friends.  As the only Canadian in the room of almost 30, I felt humbled by the warmth and hospitality with which I was welcomed.  At the front, Ed held quiet court with a few people I didn’t recognize.   I took a seat and continued catching up with old friends and new.

When the room was packed and the time was right, Ben made introductions and we were immediately passed over to Ed who jumped right in.  Throughout the first day ,we covered:

  • restraints,
  • irregular custody,
  • weapons,
  • awareness and movement principles,
  • custody work, and;
  • a homework assignment to make improvised weapons.

I’m being deliberately vague with the above as if I get into greater detail, I’ll be writing all night and also because it’s better to experience it first-hand for yourself.

There were several takeaways from the day, not the least of which were that I need to do more yoga, focus on Endemics and “always have an escape plan”.  Sound advice for anyone.

The evening went well with food and drink around the corner and making new friends and sharing stories.  I especially felt humbled that I spent a fair amount of time speaking with Ed himself about the various Mexican mythologies and esoteric symbologies used by criminal groups.  Combining the entire evening’s discussions made for an educational, eye-opening and, at times, hilarious time.  Let’s just not rehash the saga of Jaramillo…

Some of us now know of Jaramillo. We shall not speak of his fate.

Day 2

Entering the training location on Day 2 we were greeted at the door by metal detector and pat-down to see if we had absorbed and followed the previous days lessons and completed our homework.  The resulting “found” and “not found” tables displaying weapons of various varieties was quite interesting.

Top , found. Bottom, not found.

 

Banana…

We debriefed and had a chuckle over some stuff (the legendary banana shank and, we even had Tactikey represented!) and then moved right into improvised weapons & Shankology.  We covered:

  • Improvised weapons,
  • targeting,
  • knife work (inside and outside),
  • urban movement fundamentals and;
  • various hood rat shit.

By the time we ended on Sunday afternoon, I felt overloaded with new information and lessons learned.  So much had been fed to us that it would take me weeks to digest it all.

On a side note, I had come from Toronto (snowy and -10C) to Washington (drizzle and +10C) and was contacted by Air Canada that my flight was cancelled and I had been re-booked to the following morning.  This threw off my plans back home, but I made the most of it and spent the evening out for dinner again with Ed, Ben and several others from the course.  Many chicken wings and drinks later, we broke off and headed out.

My time over the weekend both training with Ed and Ben as well as socializing with them made me happy to have attended and to get to know them.

Ben (of DC Combatives) and I.  What a great guy.

Ben was very welcoming and Ed was a wealth of information and selfless in his sharing of knowledge.  So much so that I invited him to come to Toronto this year and to put on a similar seminar.  It would be an honour if he can make it work with his schedule.

Ed and I. At the end of the weekend we were given the opportunity to choose a card. I asked for Ed to choose. This is what I got. “El Diablito”.  Very humbled.  Thank you.

***IF/WHEN WE HAVE A DATE, WE WILL POST IT IMMEDIATELY HERE ON THE BLOG AND ON OUR SOCIAL MEDIA*** (Give us a follow so you don’t miss out!)

I am very happy to have gone and would recommend attending a seminar from Ed if you are able.  The training was excellent and the information covered was wide and relevant.  If you live in the Washington, DC area, do check out Ben and DC Combatives as the types of violence mitigation methodologies he teaches are grounded in reality and effective.  If he was in Toronto, I’d certainly train there.

Thank you to both Ed Calderon and Ben Drader for having me as the lone Canadian at the training seminar.

For further information about the topics and training seminars covered here, see the links below:

Till next time, stay safe and stay crafty.

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Staying Safe in Crowds

The crowds are coming.

As the holiday season approaches, we will invariably be heading out more often to places rife with people.  Be it for shopping, get-togethers, enjoying a crisp winter walk or seeing a festive event, the holiday season brings more and more people out for all these reasons and more.

Large groups of people gathered together tend to cause problems relating to safety and security.  They increase the risk of conflict between people in those large groups, they make inviting targets for those who would wish to cause harm (i.e. bad guys) and the larger the group of people in a building, the more difficult and time-consuming it is to get those people out safely, especially under panic.

Violent crowds. Dangerous times.

Examples of these would be as follows:  anytime there is one last toy of a particular kind and a fight breaks out; fights over parking spots at malls, etc.  These types of events may or may not be directly involving you, but have the potential to rope you in if you’re not paying attention.  Another is an active shooter (such as the Jane Creba shooting in Toronto) where something like gang violence occurs and innocent bystanders are caught in the middle.  And then there are times when a machete-wielding lunatic attacks random shoppers, or some fanatic decides to plough down people walking down the street with a truck.  And then there’s fire.  Nothing nefarious, but deadly nonetheless.  They happen.  Use all your senses to stay aware.  None of these are predictable in a useful sense for someone heading out for a day of shopping at the mall.  They just happen.

For the interactions that escalate, I would recommend to let it go.  Is some hot-head nut case really worth that parking spot?  Likely not.  However, this doesn’t mean I advocate not protecting yourself if someone attacks you.

George knows. It’s not worth it.

For the rest, they are “black swan events” which you have to deal with as they unfold.

Here are my thoughts on how to increase your chances of survival in crowded locations in times of danger.

  • Keep an eye open for viable exits:  as you enter malls, concert halls or crowded public spaces, keep an eye on ways out.  Be it a fire or an attack, having a pre-planned escape route can save valuable seconds getting out and saving yourself and likely others.  Better yet, if you’re there a while, hang out near the exits.  You’ll be better positioned to get out should something happen.  Also, if in a mall, take the stairs instead of the escalators.  If you have to move in a hurry you have a better position to move from as those on the escalator are trapped in the chute.

    Exits, exits everywhere! Keep an eye open.
  • Keep moving:  Staying still doesn’t help you much in a time of crisis.  If you’re still, you’re an easy target, you’re not moving away from danger and you’re not able to affect change to your circumstance, thus handing all the control to others (i.e. bad guys).  Move towards an exit, move to cover, move  to a fire extinguisher…just MOVE!  Be a difficult target.  Movement is Life.  In large crowds, most people will attempt to exit the way they came in.  This can cause a stampede-like effect where people get trampled and crushed.  A wave of humanity which is large and panicked cannot be forced.  Instead, take the better approach and aim for one of your pre-scouted exits instead.
  • In the case of an active shooter – TAKE COVER:  That’s right.  as you move, move from one place of cover to another until you exit and create time and distance between you and the threat.  Cover is something that offers ballistic protection (i.e. protection from bullets).  This is cement and concrete.  Furniture, vehicles and the like don’t provide adequate protection from bullets.  Stone, rock, thick steel and cement do.  Look for pillars, walls and the like to save you.

    Hide behind concrete.
  • Be aware of your surroundings:   Use all of your senses.  If a fire breaks out, you’ll likely have an indication before you see it because of smell.  Move to an exit.  When in a crowd, get a sense of the general “feel” of the environment.  Stay at the edges of crowds.  Look for people who don’t look or “feel” like they belong in the same group.  Situational Awareness is your early warning system for something bad happening.  It’s not meant to cultivate paranoia, it’s meant to cultivate awareness for whats going on around you so you have a chance to ACT before being acted upon.

    Keep your head on a swivel.
  • Keep Essentials on you:  Your personal Every-Day-Carry should be on you at all times.  A small knife, multi-tool, lock picks, lighter, cash, cell phone (charged), mini flashlight, some cordage, etc. can help you get out of a tough situation should you need it.

To sum up remember these key points:

  1. Be Aware (of your environment)
  2. Be prepared (with a viable EDC setup)
  3. Identify Exits (note escape routes)
  4. Keep Moving (movement is life)
  5. Take Cover (behind concrete or stone)
  6. Better yet, order online and stay home.

In closing, before you head out, switch on.  Enjoy yourself and have fun, but always remember that by being aware you are fore-warned and fore-armed.  Always have an escape plan.

Be safe.  Stay crafty.

 

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After Action Report: Covert Entry Concepts – Toronto

On the weekend of 28-29-30 July, 2017, True North Tradecraft hosted the first-ever offering of The CORE Group’s Covert Entry Concepts course in Toronto.  We had 9 students, an excellent venue, great food and of course, fantastic training.  (To read my review of the course I attended in Maryland, click here.)

Training materials before.
Training materials, after.

Friday evening saw the group meet up, make introductions and immerse themselves in Street Thief, a mockumentary based on a thief.  Though not “real”, it did accurately illustrate how an actual thief does what they do, ideas for protecting against such things and using the same methodologies in conducting security assessments and Red Team-type attacks.  That, coupled with some yummy pizza (no Hawaiian, you’re welcome Rob) made for a good evening.

Mmmm..pizza.

Starting bright and early on Saturday morning, we hit the ground running getting into the principles of physical security, locking mechanisms and the basics of attacking them.  This was framed within the construct of proper evaluation and approach vectors for attack and assessment.

The tools.

Thanks to The Lucky Penny for providing scrumptious snacks and endless coffee to get us started and keep us going.

Freshly baked and delivered food and coffee made a huge positive impact on all of us.

The entire day was fast and furious.  We hit on a vast breadth of topics and brought it all to practice very quickly.  The students were introduced to various locks and their corresponding pick and bypass tools.

Checking out a tubular lock pick.

Wafer locks, pin & tumbler, dead bolts, combination locks, padlocks, warded locks, etc.  The pace was fast but students picked-up the skills quickly and began to progress through to more difficult locks.  After everyone felt they were getting the hang of it, we moved right into impressioning and key casting.

Key impressioning. Money for nothing and your checks for free.
Key casting. Delicate but really interesting if done correctly.

Saturday had some tasty lunch too…

Rob enjoying a fine Canadian poutine. Now he has a standard to measure all others by.

The rest of the day was spent discussing elevators and their uses in Red Team operations and physical security, safes and other miscellaneous related content.

We finished off the evening as a group at a fantastic nearby Mexican restaurant where the food was excellent and the tequila and mojitos flowed.

Mmmm…guac and tequila.
So much food. So good. Cheers all!

Sunday, though rough for some more than others, continued the same high tempo.  We dove right into more elevator stuff and more impressioning challenges.

One challenge was who could impression a key properly before anyone else.

The second was the T-Rex Challenge.  Picking a lock while a electronic muscle stimulator is hooked-up to one’s forearms.  It’s a laugh for all.

Those arms are shaking. Doesn’t matter how tough you are, it was crazy.

That winners of each challenge got some stuff from our friends at Delta 2 Alpha Design (The Lolly and The Mark, and stickers, each.)

After we all stopped laughing and got feeling back in our arms, we carried on to lock bypassing, familiarization with various tools and techniques associated with it and giving them a trial run.

One of the students using an Under Door Tool to rescue someone (Rob and another student) from the bathroom.

We then transitioned to removing/replacing tamper-evident seals.  A very delicate operation to say the least, this portion of the day was slow-going and painstakingly irritating when impatience wrecked it all.  That said, it was very interesting in its method and application.  We also discussed security posturing, use, strength and limitations of seals and tamper-evident devices along with best practices.

Making tamper-evident not-so-evident. Steady hands.

To round out the weekend, we finished on a high note with restraint escapes.  Dealing in escaping unlawful custody while restrained by handcuffs, nylon zip ties, duct tape and cord.  The more you know, the better prepared you will be.

Aftermath of zip tie escape.
Tools of the trade.

 

One of the most important parts of the learning was the manner in which it was delivered.  Rob’s easy-going and humorous nature, coupled with his expansive knowledge and professionalism made for a relaxed yet powerful learning environment.  He is an exemplary instructor and trainer and is so giving of himself and his knowledge.  That and he couldn’t get over how no one carried guns.  Yay Canada.  It all makes a huge positive difference.

As with all experiences of this kind, there was so much more we covered and were exposed to that it simply wouldn’t do it justice to speak to here.  There is only so much you can read about or learn from on YouTube before you hit a wall.  Well-delivered, quality, in-person training has no substitute.  I recommend this training to anyone interested in these skills. In the end, an excellent group made an excellent class.  Congratulations to all.

Certificate. It was all worth it.

We are excited about how everything went that we are already planning our next offering.  Keep tuned to the Blog (and Instagram and Facebook) for more details.

Thank you to Rob and to all others who helped make this happen and make it great (See below) and thank you to all who attended.

Till next time,

Stay Crafty.

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Every Day Carry – My Take

Part of my Every Day Carry (EDC)

So, here we are.  A pretty vast topic with a bazillion opinions on what is right and what isn’t.

For the uninitiated, Every Day Carry, or EDC for short, is a collection of items which you carry on your person at all times (every day) to expand your level of preparedness and resilience in your daily activities and also to provide an edge in unforeseen situations.  This doesn’t always have to be a life-or-death catastrophe.  It can be something as simple as needing emergency cash, or cut packaging, but if you don’t have simple, quality, accessible tools for such things, you’d be at a disadvantage.  In a graver scenario, if catastrophe strikes and you’re unprepared, you’ll be less-likely to weather the storm.  Either way, you should always have an escape plan.

In a larger sense, your EDC is only a small part of a larger personal resilience plan, however, I’ll write separate posts for vehicle, office, home and emergency kits later on.  Right now, lets start at the most basic.

At the end of the day, I believe in three principles to follow when developing and gearing-up your Every Day Carry (EDC).

  1. FLEXIBILE: Is your kit adaptable to changing conditions?  Can it be scaled-up/down as needed?
  2. EFFECTIVE:  Are these items useful for multiple scenarios?  
  3. APPROPRIATE:  Will this be too much to carry, too attention-grabbing, or are the pieces of low quality and will fail you in your time of need?  Is it appropriate for your environment (Toronto, ON versus Manatoulin Island, versus Dallas, TX)?  Carrying a gun in Toronto is far different than Dallas, or in the woods of Manatoulin versus a courthouse in Toronto.  

A publication I recently read listed the appropriate EDC of a security-conscious individual as this:

  • Cell or Smartphone
  • Concealed carry handgun (WTF?!)
  • Extra magazine (again, WTF?!)
  • Flashlight
  • Folding knife
  • Lighter
  • Pen & Paper
  • Multi-tool
  • Money
  • Watch

That said, you’ll notice that concealed carry handgun(!) is on the list, as well as an extra magazine.  Now, that may fly in the US, but anywhere in Canada, you’ll be looking at jail time with that load-out.  Most of the rest on the list is pretty good, but again, assessing your daily EDC with the 3 Principles mentioned above should allow you to ensure your one step ahead of a problem.  Learn unarmed self-defence, use a steel-barrelled pen and a low-profile impact weapon of you need, but for the love of all that is imagined holy, don’t carry a gun around in Canada unless you want the cops after you.

Here is a picture of some of what I carry on me on a daily basis in Toronto, Canada.

My partial EDC load-out.

The above include:

  • Fisher Space Pen (writes consistently, small size)
  • Mini Bic lighter
  • Tiny USB key
  • Subway tokens (never know when you might need to abandon your car).
  • RAT-1 foldint knife (not “tactical” looking, just a simple, sharp, disposable blade).
  • Band-Aids (because you never know if you or someone else would need one.
  • Lock picks (several sets, because you just never know).
  • Diamond wire rod (again, because you never know).
  • Cash (because cash is king, and you might need a slice of pizza sometime).
  • Low-pro clip wallet

I also carry a few more things not in the picture, such as:

  • 1-2 steel-barrelled pens (Like Zebra or Parker) *not tactical-looking.
  • Tiny Inconspicuous Handcuff Key (because unlawful restraint wouldn’t customarily be conveniently timed).
  • 2-3 6′ lengths of Kevlar/Technora cordage
  • B.A.T. Coin (by Covert Products Group – read my review here.)
  • Key chain with my keys (No JI, I won’t post a picture of them
  • Anything else the day may call for based on my quick intel-dump before I leave – such as weather, traffic, events/protests in the city, etc…
  • Tiny LED flashlight (review soon…)
  • The Lolly (from Delta2Alpha.com )
Inside-the-fly of my Triple Aught Design Recon shorts. As if the Lolly isn’t even there.
About the size of a house key. Weighs next to nothing.

 

I do also ALWAYS wear a watch and will have my phone with me 99% of the time.  (in a dire emergency, I can always barter or pawn my watch for some cash and still have my phone for comms).

I love my watch. Titanium, lightweight, atomic and solar, compass and barometer and more.

For my daily purposes, there won’t be a gun involved in any way and multi-tools are too bulky for my activities.  Canadian laws would make me a SWAT-team call-out for a pistol, so that’s kinda off the table.

As a matter of course, I carry lock picks.  I’ve received several shocked and troubled looks from people should they find out about this, thinking I’m a burglar or something nefarious, but the simple fact is that I strictly adhere to lock picking ethics (read more about it here) and have used them to either help others (with permission, opened a car door for a guy who locked himself out in a blizzard with the car running – I saw it happen) or myself (lost the key to my bike lock) and only would use them to save a life in a dire circumstance.  Otherwise, they’re just tools used for the sport of Locksport.  I feel that, in an emergency, sometimes salvation is behind a locked door.  Better to make amends later when you’re safe, than not have the chance.

If you want an opportunity to learn how to pick locks, check out this amazing opportunity in Toronto in July 2017.    Details HERE!!!

I feel that this load out works for me, for my lifestyle, in Toronto, most of the time.  Thankfully it is scalable, can be augmented with things from my car.  (As mentioned above, I’ll be doing a piece on other EDC/kits at a later time) I also like that it is near-zero visibility thanks to the clip wallet and my spread placement across my person.

The great thing about EDC is that it’s a wide-open topic with huge on-going debates.  I prefer to focus on adjusting mine to my needs and environment (Toronto, Canada) while adhering to the 3 principles I mentioned and looking for new ways to make it more concealed and admissible into non-permissive environments.

The bottom line is this:

Keep some things on you wherever you go that will help you out of a jam if things get tough.  

By following those 3 principles and investing in decent equipment, you’ll be miles ahead of the masses who only have their phone when things go sideways.

In the meantime, keep modifying, keep testing, keep improving.

Till next time, stay crafty.

 

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Training Opportunity – Covert Entry Concepts – Toronto, July 2017

For the FIRST time in Canada….

The CORE Group

Covert Entry Concepts – 1st Canadian Offering
This course will teach Law Enforcement Personnel, Special Operations Forces, and Government employees and security professionals the principles of lock bypassing and making covert entries into buildings or properties.

This class is entirely hands on. From the moment you enter the course you will have tools in your hand and are working to exploit various locking mechanisms. Students will learn to recognize the vulnerabilities in existing hardware, how they are attacked, or sometimes even bypassed entirely. You’ll walk away with the skills needed to compromise most of the locks used in North America today. Students will be much better positioned to provide service in a variety of tactical areas: check welfare calls, search and arrest warrant service, establishing sniper positions, sneak and peak operations, surveillance operations, fire safe opening, and breaking and entering investigations.

Since the techniques taught in this class are largely nondestructive, agencies will also benefit by having a decrease in civil actions due to property damage.

The cost of the course is $675 USD or $895 CAD with a $200 deposit required to hold your place.

E-mail us at:

[email protected]

for more information and payment instructions.

(***See link to flyer at bottom***)

 

Schedule is:

Fri July 28: 1800hrs – late

Sat July 29: 0800hrs -1700hrs

Sun July 30: 0800hrs – 1700hrs

Included Equipment:

Included in the cost of the course is a comprehensive set of high quality tools that you can use on the job or practice at home to maintain the skills you’ll build in class.
• High Quality 12 Piece Pick Set
• Set of covert jigglers
• Set of warded picks
• Bump Hammer
• Bump keys
• An ez decoder
• Underdoor tool

***Friday dinner, Sat & Sun breakfasts, coffee and snacks included. Team dinner scheduled for Saturday night.

This course is being offered by The CORE Group      (www.enterthecore.net) , supported and sponsored by True North Tradecraft (www.truenorthtradecraft.ca) and Tactical Beaver Ltd.( www.tacticalbeaver.co ) .

“TB Classic” Logo Design

Tactical Beaver will have a selection of its Premier Apparel line available for sale during the duration of the course at a discount for attendees.

COVERT ENTRY CONCEPTS_July 2017 flyer

 

DISCLAIMER:  *Nothing in the course offering is intended to be used for unlawful purposes.  Consult with your local laws prior to employing these techniques in the field.  This is intended for lawful use ONLY.  True North Tradecraft and its partners do not condone or advocate illegal activities.*

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Training Review – Covert Entry Concepts by The CORE Group

How often have you thought “hey, I wish I could learn that…but the training is only available in the US.  So much for that.”?  I have.  Many times.  So, in my quest to build my own skills, I saved up some money and travelled to the United States to attend training I had my eye for months.

In November 2016, I had the privilege of attending the Covert Entry Concepts (CEC) training course in Maryland.  It was put on by The CORE Group in their Maryland facilities and wow, what a good time it was.

The CORE Group

(*I lucked-out by taking two courses back-to-back at The CORE Groups’ Maryland facilities, the Covert Entry Concepts and Physical Security Analyst.  This is a review for Covert Entry Concepts.  I will post a review of the Physical Security Analyst soon.)

The purpose of the course, in broad strokes, is to be given an education in physical security, how to identify and exploit any weaknesses with the ultimate goal to test those weaknesses and close any found loopholes for a client to protect them from attack.  As a security professional myself, I feel that expanding my skill sets is a responsibility to make me more effective in my job.

About The CORE Group (from their website):

The CORE Group was initially formed by a trio of security auditors and researchers who had collaborated on numerous projects and conference events over the years. At present, their combined experience in the physical security sector represents decades of hard knowledge and applied work.  The CORE Group finds innovative ways to augment typical security auditing and assessment. Most companies incorporate digital penetration testing and web application testing into their standard procedure of self-assessment. The CORE Group offers a variety of packages that can greatly assist in a company’s understanding of their security posture at a fraction of the cost of larger, more “conventional” testing.

The CORE Group conducts training all over, training Law Enforcement & Military, Government Agencies, Physical Security specialists, Red Team and PenTesters, IT Security and Locksport enthusiasts.  They attend many of the “cons” (such as Black Hat, DEF CON, SANS, etc.) throughout the US, many times running the “Lockpick Village”  and providing intensive training to professionals all over.

The course was a 2-day, Monday/Tuesday set-up.  A mixed bag of Law Enforcement, Military, physical security professionals and “other, government” types.  A good group of people to get to know and learn with.  Our Instructor, Rob, Chief of the Law Enforcement training division of The CORE Group, was welcoming and professional from the word “go”.  After some quick ice-breakers, we moved right into an introduction to lockpicking.

Learning lock picking concepts.

Discussions, anecdotes, slides and practical demonstrations were all used to great effect in training to underline the principles and applications for what were were learning about in that moment.  Everything was helped by Rob’s sense of humour, positive attitude, patience and obvious expertise in the subject matter.  We worked on a vast array of topics.  Lock-picking; bumping; bypasses; construction; safes; tamper-evident seals; elevators; impressioning; the Mace Face Challenge; casting keys; attack vectors; padlocks; restraint escapes and so much more.  So much information was covered that, even weeks later, I found myself re-reading the detailed notes I had made in an effort to absorb it all.  Not only was it an incredible amount of practical and useful information, but much of it was eye-opening and fascinating as well.  Not all aspects are covered in every session that Rob delivers due to geography or other issues, but my experience was just great.

Here is a look at some of the stuff we got to play with:

Learning to cut keys.
Classroom all set-up.
The challenges ahead…
The tools.  The cookie is of the utmost importance.
Practicing skills.

After enjoying amazing chicken, fantastic bbq, getting to know the other participants and doing an awesome escape exercise preceded by burpees (I hate burpees) it ended up being a really great time.

I felt as if it was a skill-building game-changer.  The depth and breadth of knowledge shared and learned was exceptional.  Though these are all perishable skills requiring regular practice, the base is unmistakably solid.  It certainly opened the door to a world of opportunities.  The people I met and the confidence in my abilities were well worth the cost and effort to travel south of the border.  I highly recommend taking this training if you have the means and opportunity.  It’s a staple of tradecraft and is useful in a myriad of situations (all ethically bounded, of course).  Use your powers for good.  And if you work hard, you can earn one of these…

The prize.  Earned.  BOOM.

 

NOW…

If you’re interested in taking this course IN CANADA, True North Tradecraft, in partnership with Tactical Beaver, will be sponsoring a unique run of this course in downtown Toronto on the weekend of July 28-29-30, 2017, to be taught by Rob of The CORE Group.  This training is not available anywhere else in Canada (to my knowledge – and I’ve searched) and is well worth it’s weight in gold.  It will include top-tier instruction, a kit of equipment for you to practice on and keep when you’re done and breakfast daily with dinner on the Friday night.  For more detailed information, e-mail us at [email protected] .  Spaces are limited and booking up already.  Tactical Beaver will also have a table with great apparel available to purchase at a discount.

Check it out.  It’s a really great opportunity to learn from an expert in the field and do so IN CANADA!

See you at CEC – Toronto!

-Stay Crafty