SAD Tool 3.0

SAD-TOOL 3.0

Designed by 4TAC5.COM and manufactured in the UK by OscarDelta SPD.

The Special Activities Development Tool is corrosion resistant 304 Full Hard Stainless Steel that differs from other forms of 304 in that it has been
hard cold rolled to its full hard condition. This increases its fatigue life. In its full hard condition, type 304 stainless steel
has a tensile strength of 185,000 PSI minimum, and a minimum yield strength of 140,000 PSI.

With the appropriate skills, knowledge and understanding can be used to facilitate escape from unlawful restraints and captivity
using non-destructive methods. It is recommended that you have one spare SAD Tool that can be used for ‘development’ to explore
the capabilities and potential applications of the tool. These ‘special activities’ require access to a set of handcuffs,
heavy duty cable-ties and a budget padlock (pin and cylinder that locks on one side of the shackle).

With practice you will be able to remove handcuffs without a key (single and double/transport lock) and exploit weaknesses in
the handcuff design to bypass the double-lock mechanism to allow for shimming etc. These methods can be used on so called ‘high security’
handcuffs that have additional features that would normally require a unique or non-standard key to operate.

With continued practice it works quicker than a key for taking off the double-lock, particularly when handcuffed to the rear.

You can also use the tool to open a budget padlock without a key and remove cable-ties using non-destructive methods.

*** THE SAD-TOOL 3.0 CAN BE INSTALLED ON THE TECHNORA ESCAPE NECKLACE / APEK ***

Counter-Kidnap Handbook

COUNTER KIDNAP & HOSTAGE SURVIVAL HANDBOOK

This is the OSCARDELTA SPD edited version of the restricted 4TAC5 Counter Kidnap & Hostage Survival Handbook.

Contents:

KIDNAPPING & HOSTAGE-TAKING INTRODUCTION
DEFINITIONS
TYPES OF HOSTAGE-TAKERS
TYPES OF HOSTAGE SITUATIONS
HOSTAGE SELECTION
COUNTER KIDNAP…SOFT TARGET VS HARD TARGET
PROTECTION THROUGH AWARENESS
VISIBILITY
TARGET IDENTIFIERS
VIP
FAMILY MEMBERS
SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS FOR CHILDREN
HOME SECURITY
HOME TARGET HARDENING
VEHICLE PREPARATION
TRAVEL
DRIVING
WALKING
AIRPORTS
FLYING
HOTELS
DETECTING SURVEILLANCE
COMMON TYPES OF SURVEILLANCE
ROUTE ANALYSIS
ATTACK RECOGNITION
ESCAPE AND EVASION
SHOCK OF CAPTURE!
ESCAPE OR SURRENDER?
PASSIVE INFORMATION COLLECTION
THERE ARE ONLY 4 OUTCOMES…
HOSTAGE SURVIVAL INTRODUCTION
THE BEHAVIOUR OF CAPTORS TOWARDS THEIR HOSTAGES
STAGES OF ADAPTION TO CAPTIVITY
STRESS REACTIONS IN CAPTIVITY
INTIMIDATION AND CONTROL
STABILISATION
SITUATIONAL AWARENESS
CONFRONTATIONS
DEFENCE MECHANISMS
DENIAL
REGRESSION & IDENTIFICATION
THE ‘STOCKHOLM SYNDROME’
COPING WITH CAPTIVITY
LIVING CONDITIONS
DIGNITY AND SELF-RESPECT
FEAR
PHYSICAL AND MENTAL FITNESS
ESTABLISHING RAPPORT
EXPLOITATION OF HOSTAGES
PLAN FOR RELEASE OR RESCUE
RELEASES & RESCUE ATTEMPTS
AFTER THE RELEASE OR RESCUE
DEBRIEFING & RECOVERY
POST-RELEASE STRESS REACTIONS
WHEN TO SEEK ASSISTANCE WITH POST-RELEASE STRESS
HOSTAGE SURVIVAL STRATEGIES

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Training Review: Counter Custody and Hostage Survival with 4TAC5 in Chicago, IL.

Training Review: IRETC with 4TAC5, Chicago, IL, May 2018

In May of this year (2018), I travelled to Chicago to expand my skills in the field of Counter-custody and counter-kidnapping but attending the IRETC Instructor Certification with Karl from 4TAC5.

For the longest time I had been working towards attending the counter-custody instructor certification course with 4TAC5 – IRETC (International Restraint Escape Training Course). I had tried for months to connect with them and was planning to travel to their training base in England to attend it when I was referred to Aaron Cunningham of the ITTA (International Tactical Training Association) as they were going to be hosing IRETC in Chicago. As luck would have it this made things much more convenient and less expensive.

Upon arrival I made contact with Aaron and he picked me up from the airport. I treated him to breakfast for the courtesy. As I had only had communications with him through e-mail to that point it was good to finally put a face to the name and get to know him. After breakfast, Aaron and I took a little tour around Chicago (he showed me some of the sights and gave me some background to the respective history and current situations with specific neighbourhoods we were traversing) and then we did two more circles to the airport to pick up other attendees and finally to pick up our instructor, Karl, and make our way to the training facility and our lodgings.

There were 4 of us with Karl and Aaron. A small but diverse group of LEO/MIL personnel.

***I will not speak to the identities of the others in the training as they are currently operational with their respective security services, nor will I get into specifics of the training due to it’s nature. ***

Over that first evening we all had a chance to get to know one another and discuss the upcoming week of training. Admittedly, I was very excited to get the training started and build upon my existing skills.

The next day training started and we covered a LOT of ground. The content for day 1 was vaguely as follows:

  • Overview of material, counter-custody principles, kidnapping & hostage survival;
  • Detailed review of improvised restraints and manufactured restraints;
  • Improvised tools against restraints;
  • Mindset and tactics

I felt as if I’d been overloaded with information and it took me a while to process what I was learning. So much amazing stuff was coming to me – efficient and effective techniques and principles to put to use immediately. My hands and wrists were smashed and raw by the end of the day but it was well worth the pain to gain the knowledge and hands-on experience in a controlled environment where mistakes can be made and learning can occur. Very helpful when you get yourself in a pickle and need someone to cut you out so you can try again.

Day 2 was much the same in so far as having a firehose of info shot my way. After a great breakfast, we got fuelled up on coffee and a recap of the previous day’s material and dove right in.

  • Recap Day 1;
  • Tools, carry, concealment and deployment;
  • Handcuffs (various, identify, function, features)
  • More mindset and tactics;
  • Special tools (contents, function, use)
  • Anatomy of abduction and custody (phases, counter-intelligence, immediate actions)
  • Captivity & custody Exercise

Day 2 was a long day filled with more work, soreness and trial and error. However, the more exhaustively we practiced, the more confident I was with the little curve balls that were thrown our way and, with patience and focus, they could be overcome.

Day 2 dinner was another great time gelling with the group and expanding on the day’s lessons.

***BTW the food in Chicago was AWESOME!***

Day 3 was the Big Cahuna. Exercise after exercise after exercise, more scenarios and practice. Very involved to test our newly acquired skills and assure we’d assimilated the little tricks and remained focused on the task regardless of the negative stimulus applied. I found this culmination was a thorough test of my skills and my ability to apply them under stress and in unknown conditions.

As a finale to the week, Aaron arranged a tour of the Chicago Police Marine Unit (with associated boat ride and waterfront tour) and topped it off with a ride-along with the Chicago Police Aviation Unit aboard a CPD helicopter above downtown Chicago. And, as it was Tuesday, what better dinner to have than tacos? I guess you really haven’t lived till you’ve watch a White Sox game at Wrigley Field from a police helicopter. Karl and I had a blast. What a great night.

The following day included a debrief, discussions, clean-up and certification presentations. My trip to the airport was bitter-sweet. I had made some new friends, learned and experienced some top-tier training and was leaving a very Toronto-like city (minus the 14 people who were shot while I was there).

I extend my sincerest thanks to Aaron Cunningham and the ITTA for hosting the training and for their wonderful hospitality. True professionals doing a great job.

To Karl of 4TAC5, thank you for your knowledge, patience and great sense of humour during the week.

To the Chicago Police Marine and Aviation units – thank you for your hospitality and for the amazing ride-alongs. Stay safe out there!

And to my fellow attendees, thank you for the laughs and lessons. Stay safe in your respective areas of operation and keep in touch.

For those of you who are in Canada looking for counter-custody and hostage survival training, keep your eyes peeled for our offerings for both civilians and military/law enforcement (restricted content) or contact us directly for private training solutions for your group.

For more information on mentioned training and entities, see below and feel free to contact us.

International Tactical Training Association

4TAC5

Oscar Delta

Hard Case Survival

Lockpicktools.com

Stay safe, stay crafty and ALWAYS HAVE AN ESCAPE PLAN.

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Travel Security – Personal Security On the Go

If you make travel secure, you make it more fun.

This is Part 3 in a series on Personal Security during travel.

As you’re packing for your trip, make sure you go through the pre-travel planning process to ensure that you’re dotting all your “I”s and crossing all your “T”s.

  • Ensure all of your passports, visas, tickets, cash and itineraries are in order;
  • Conduct a map reduce of the area in which you’ll be travelling;
  • Send an info package to a relative or trusted friend in case you need help while abroad;
  • Arrange for your home and affairs to be taken care of while you’re away.

Proper Previous Planning Prevents Piss-Poor Performance.

Read more about the above in the previous posts on Travel Security:

When preparing to go (either to the airport, train/bus station sea port, etc – it applies to all equally), ensure you charge all of your devices and that you have the appropriate connectors and adaptors for the region in which you will be travelling.

Take an empty water bottle and some snacks with you so that you can refill it post-security and always have a drink.  You never know when you may be delayed and airports are notoriously expensive.

At the airport, keep your passport and ticket/boarding pass hidden to avoid people targeting you and gleaning information about you and your travel.  As you walk through the airport, keep an eye open for places of cover should an attack occur.  Columns and pillars, concrete planters, walls and corners as well as exit stairwells can offer ballistic protection.  Try to stay away from public-side-facing windows.

As you move through the port/station keep an eye for exits, cover and vantage points.

As a general rule, try to pack for quick and easy movement.   Travel light and fast.  I avoid checking a bag if I can which enables easier movement and less of a chance of lost luggage.  Stick with low-profile, non-tactical-looking luggage and bags.  The only downside is that if you’re travelling with items prohibited from going in the cabin of the plane, you’ll be forced to check a bag.  DO NOT try to sneak anything through security as it’ll either be seized (best case) or you’ll end up arrested (worse) depending on the local laws.

Here’s another tip:  DON’T AGREE TO TAKE SOMEONE ELSE’S BAGS FOR THEM!  It doesn’t matter if it’s an old lady, a “man of the cloth” or a child “travelling alone”.  Carry only your bags, keep a vigilant watch over them at ALL times, don’t leave them unattended and say no to anyone asking you to carry something for them.

Maintain the integrity of your bags and never take anything for anyone.

If you find yourself waiting on the public side of an airport or rail terminal, keep your eyes open for suspicious activity.  Set yourself up where you have a good vantage point and no one behind you, close to cover.  If you observe someone suddenly get up and walks away from a bag or parcel, quickly find cover and tell security services.  If you leave your bags unattended, you risk losing them to security.

Report unattended bags in stations and ports immediately and create distance/move to cover in case of attack.

While travelling, do your best to be aware of the local news and goings-on.  This can give you a feel for the local environment in which you find yourself and to possibly give you a heads-up in case of impending bad weather, criminal threats or civil unrest.

ALWAYS secure your passport.  It is the most important item you have when travelling abroad.  And depending on the country of issue, it can be worth upwards of $50k on the black market.

Your passport is the most important document you have. PROTECT IT.

When you arrive to your destination and have cleared customs/immigration, you can then “tool up” with any gear you have legally transported or acquire locally-sourced tools.

Do your best to blend in with the local population.  Look at online photos of locals and get a sense for what they wear and how they go about their days.  Consider stopping by a local store to purchase similar clothing to wear while you’re “in country” and then leave them behind when returning home.  With this method, you are essentially renting a “persona”and will bring down your visibility as a tourist to some degree.  Leave your “5.11 Tuxedo” at home and get something local instead.  Oakleys, Salomons and 5.11 pants and shirt that all say “covert” are usually anything but.

Your covert clothing, isn’t.

If you’re in a situation where no amount of “low-key” will do it (such as travelling with your family or in a group) do the best you can and always remain polite.  A smile and a kind word can go a long way in the right context.  With this in mind, don’t discuss your personal life with strangers.  You don’t know who they are or how they could use that information against you.  Steer your conversations about their home country under the auspices of learning more about them.

Always be wary of slick or sleazy locals who appear too good to be true.

When travelling to and from your accommodations (or any base), vary your route and timings and maintain your situational awareness at all times so that you’re not being observed or followed.

When moving around, don’t carry all of your cash in the same place on your person.  Break it up across your pockets, decoy wallet and other stashes.  Use credit cards when you can to reduce the visibility of cash.

Maps are good. Get one, study it and have it handy.

When on the ground, take a few mins to orientate yourself to the area using your maps and the local geography.  Look for common landmarks and pay attention while being transported from the airport.

When you’re first able, make contact and touch base with the folks back home to give them a status report that you’ve landed and what your situation is.  This allows those back home to have a time marker as to when was the last contact they had with you, where you were and what you were doing should something happen.

Couldn’t help it…I can’t stand the term “touch base”.

Beware of situations where you are consuming alcohol or drugs (say no to drugs, even if the jerk-off on the beach tells you it’s completely legal, you have no idea what is in it and if you’re being set-up) in the company of those who you do not trust completely.  Also, try and stick to bottles and cans instead of drinks mixed out of view, lest someone spike it.  And never leave your drink unattended or unobserved.

**The video below shows exactly how easy it is to have your drink spiked**

While travelling around, try to use ride-sharing services like Uber of Lyft over taxis as they are more reliable with better kept records of your trips.  You’re also less likely to be robbed (as you don’t require cash to take a ride with them) and if something goes wrong, the driver, car and trip details are all stored with you and the company.  If taxis are your only option, prior to getting in, ask for how much it would cost and take a look inside to ensure all looks legit and there are door handles in back.  Either way, ALWAYS have a method of escape (some form of window breaker) to get out should something go sideways.

Example of the GTFO Wrist strap available from Oscar Delta (link at bottom).

On the more likely side, you’re also more likely to be the victim of “tourist pricing” when arranging rides.  For example, a local taking a taxi may only get charged $4 whereas a tourist will get charged $40 for the same ride.

Change money in banks or approved locations with security, not back alley “cambios” where you might get mugged after people know you have cash.

Be wary of sleazy or too-smooth locals who want to be your friend

When buying supplies in local stores, keep an eye on the price tags that are on articles and ask what currency they represent.  And if they start taking prices off articles as they “ring them in”, you’re being scammed.  They’ll present you with a price which you won’t be able to recall and you’ll be left wondering what happened.  You’re better served to walk away and try elsewhere unless you’re really in a jam.

When checking into your accommodations, ensure that the bellhop goes in first, and that the lights are on.  Check every nook and crannyImmediately ensure that the doors and locks are all in working order and use a door wedge to secure the door once you’re alone and have engaged all of the locks.  Draw the curtains and turn on the tv when you’re not in your room and hang the Do Not Disturb sign on the knob.

Always sweep your hotel room upon entry and ensure you secure it.

In respect to OPSEC (OPerational SECurity), ensure that you aren’t posting too much on social media which can identify things like your room, locations you’re visiting and valuables you may have on you.  Post after you’ve returned or at least left the location.

In the event of a disaster or large-scale event, make your way by whatever means necessary to the Canadian (in my case) or alternately, to an allied nation’s embassy for protection and support.  The United States, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand or another Commonwealth country will support you when carrying a Canadian passport.

Find out where your local (and allied) embassies are in relation to where you’re travelling. If you find yourself in trouble they can help.

Situational awareness, pre-planning, having local currency (and knowing the exchange rate) and a resilient mindset will help deal with most problems you would encounter on your travels.  Travel light, travel low-profile and arm yourself with as much knowledge about the area you’ll be in.  Remember, low-profile equals a difficult target.

GTFO Wrist strat available from Oscar Delta here.

Till next time, stay safe and stay crafty.

About us

True North Tradecraft

As a Canadian, I have found it extremely difficult to access quality training and gear within my own borders. Not to say that skilled professionals don’t exist here – far from it – but rather the availability of opportunities for training and access to equipment is very limited compared to our neighbours to the South.

In that vein, I travelled outside of Canada not only train with specialists over the years (military, law enforcement and other specialists) but to develop and build on my own skills. This has allowed my immersion into a full-spectrum of approaches which otherwise would not be available to me and bring them back here, to re-conceptualize them from a Canadian perspective.

As Canada does not have options for the carriage of firearms or other weapons by average civilians, personal security and self-defence require a different approach to be effective within a more non-permissive environment.

Through that process, True North Tradecraft came into being. With a drive to help others and continue to serve my country, I hope to give all Canadians access to tradecraft and personal security awareness, tactics and knowledge to thrive within our legal system and maintain that security wherever they go worldwide through less-than-permissive lands.

Please, drop us a line at [email protected] and follow us on LinkedInFacebook and Instagram.

Thanks.

Stay Safe.  Stay Crafty.

The Author joined the Canadian Forces as a Infantry Reservist in 1998, eventually transitioning to Intelligence and then to his current position as a member of the Military Police. He was decorated with the Canadian Forces’ Decoration for his service. He is also a 17-year veteran of the Federal government, having served 5 years as a Customs Officer (with his last year in a Special Enforcement Unit) and the last 12 working in Transportation Security & Emergency Preparedness, incident management and national security. He has delivered training to various other government departments on security-related topics, as well as other stakeholders, and currently acts as departmental liaison officer and Active Assailant trainer for the Department of Transport. Additionally, He has attended several other survival, security, protection and preparedness training courses (both private and government) and is continually seeking out new methods and knowledge. He lives in Toronto.

We are pleased to announce that we are the exclusive Canadian distributors for the following equipment suppliers:

Oscar Delta SPD

Hard Case Survival / Lockpicktools.com

Tactikey